Take Inspiration From Swami Vivekananda


Swami Vivekananda (film)

Swami Vivekananda (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From Times Of India

http://timesofindia.speakingtree.in/spiritual-blogs/seekers/philosophy/swami-vivekanandas-sayings

 

Swami Vivekananda is in the headlines for all the wrong reasons, because politicians today are maligning his name for their myopic purposes. However, one can, even today, take inspiration from his words:

1. Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life – think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success.

2. Be a hero. Always say, “I have no fear.” Tell this to everyone — “Have no fear.”
Fear is death, fear is sin, fear is hell, fear is unrighteousness, fear is wrong life. All the negative thoughts and ideas that are in the world have proceeded from this evil spirit of fear. Face the brute, which is a lesson for all life—face the terrible, face it boldly. The hardships of life fall back when we cease to flee before them.

3. We must have friendship for all; we must be merciful toward those that are in misery; when people are happy, we ought to be happy; and to the wicked we must be indifferent. These attitudes will make the mind peaceful.

4. Fill the brain with the high thoughts, the highest ideals, place them day and night before you, and out of that will come great work. Who will give the world light? Sacrifice in the past has been the Law, it will be, alas, for ages to come. The earth’s bravest and best will have to sacrifice themselves for the good of many, for the welfare of all.

5. Truth, purity, and unselfishness – whenever these are present, there is no power below or above the sun to crush the possessor thereof. Equipped with these, one individual is able to face the whole universe in opposition.

6. Everything can be sacrificed for truth, but truth cannot be sacrificed for anything.
Strength is the sign of vigour, the sign of life, the sign of hope, the sign of health, and the sign of everything that is good. As long as the body lives, there must be strength in the body, strength in the mind, strength in the hand.

7. Great work requires great and persistent effort for a long time. Character has to be established through a thousand stumbles. As different streams having different sources all mingle their waters in the sea, so different tendencies various though they appear, crooked or straight, all lead to God.

8. So long as millions live in hunger and ignorance, I hold every person a traitor who, having been educated at their expense, pays not the least heed to them.

9. We are what our thoughts have made us; so take care about what you think. Words are secondary. Thoughts live; they travel far.

10. Stand up, be bold, be strong. Take the whole responsibility on your own shoulders, and know that you are the creator of your own destiny. All the strength and succour you want is within yourselves. Therefore, make your own future.

11. Do not believe in a thing because you have read about it in a book. Do not believe in a thing because another man has said it was true. Do not believe in words because they are hallowed by tradition. Find out the truth for yourself. Reason it out. That is realization.

Happy Birthday to Swami Vivekanand


Today is Swami Vivekanand’s 150th birthday.

Swamiji was a lion who roared on the soil of India and gave back to the Indians the self respect which they had lost under years of foreign rule and a systematic attack on their cultural values.

In the course of a short life of thirty-nine years (1863-1902), of which only ten were devoted to public activities, Swamiji travelled twice to the West, studied scriptures, wrote four classics – Jnana-Yoga, Bhakti-Yoga, Karma-Yoga, and Raja-Yoga, established Sri Ramakrishna Math, Sri Ramakrishna Mission, Advaita Ashram, wrote inspirational articles and letters, delivered innumerable lectures, composed numerous poems, and acted as spiritual guide to the many seekers who came to him for instruction.

I join my fellow countrymen to salute this great Sanyaasi.

With great pleasure I have to inform you that on January 15 I have been invited by Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Sector 62, Noida to deliver a talk on Swami Vivekanand. It is a matter of great honour for me, and I feel humbled.

Standing tall between two giants – Swami Vivekanand and Sri Aurobindo – what more could have I asked for!

Religion is not for the weak” – Swami Vivekananda


Swami Vivekananda

Swami Vivekananda (Photo credit: On Being)

“Religion is not for the weak” – Swami Vivekananda

via Atanu Dey on India‘s Development

An article on Swami Vivekananda in the Wall Street Journal of 30th March titled, “What Did J.D. Salinger, Leo Tolstoy, and Sarah Bernhardt Have in Common?”

makes for delightful reading. What they had in common was their devotion to Swami Vivekananda, the man who introduced Vedanta and yoga to America.

I did not know that. But anyway, it’s the sort of positive article about a Hindu monk that would give conniptions to the leftist “secular intellectuals” in India.

But the Wall Street Journal does not suffer from the knee-jerk negative reflex of the main stream English language media in India;

the latter would recoil with horror at the mere thought of publishing a laudatory piece about a proud Hindu. Wouldn’t that be tantamount to endorsing — horror of horrors — Hindutva?

Yoga is popular in the US and in many non-Muslim parts of the world. Why it is not popular in the Islamic world is interesting (and more about that later.) An excerpt from the WSJ article:

Although all but forgotten by America’s 20 million would-be yoginis, clad in their finest Lululemon, Vivekananda was the Bengali monk who introduced the word “yoga” into the national conversation.

In 1893, outfitted in a red, flowing turban and yellow robes belted by a scarlet sash, he had delivered a show-stopping speech in Chicago.

The event was the tony Parliament of Religions, which had been convened as a spiritual complement to the World’s Fair, showcasing the industrial and technological achievements of the age.

On its opening day, September 11, Vivekananda, who appeared to be meditating onstage, was summoned to speak and did so without notes.

“Sisters and Brothers of America,” he began, in a sonorous voice tinged with “a delightful slight Irish brogue,” according to one listener, attributable to his Trinity College–educated professor in India. “It fills my heart with joy unspeakable…”

Then something unprecedented happened, presaging the phenomenon decades later that greeted the Beatles (one of whom, George Harrison, would become a lifelong Vivekananda devotee).

The previously sedate crowd of 4,000-plus attendees rose to their feet and wildly cheered the visiting monk, who, having never before addressed a large gathering, was as shocked as his audience. “I thank you in the name of the most ancient order of monks in the world,” he responded, flushed with emotion.

“I thank you in the name of the mother of religions, and I thank you in the name of millions and millions of Hindu people of all classes and sects.”

I feel a kinship to Swami Vivekananda–which arises not merely from my being a Bengali and a Hindu like he was. It’s more of an intellectual kinship that transcends space and time.

Swami ji had the power to move people spiritually and emotionally. I knew that George Harrison was influenced by Indian thought but I did not know that the path lay through Vivekananda:

“No doubt the vast majority of those present hardly knew why they had been so powerfully moved,” Christopher Isherwood wrote a half century later, surmising that a “strange kind of subconscious telepathy” had infected the hall, beginning with Vivekananda’s first words, which have resonated, for some, long after.

Asked about the origins of “My Sweet Lord,” George Harrison replied that “the song really came from Swami Vivekananda, who said, ‘If there is a God, we must see him. And if there is a soul, we must perceive it.’ ”

The teachings of Vedanta are rooted in the Vedas, ancient scriptures going back several thousand years that also inform Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism.

The Vedic texts of the Upanishads enshrine a core belief that God is within and without—that the divine is everywhere.

The Bhagavad Gita (Song of God) is another sacred text or gospel, whereas Hinduism is actually a coinage popularized by Vivekananda to describe a faith of diverse and myriad beliefs.

Vivekananda’s genius was to simplify Vedantic thought to a few accessible teachings that Westerners found irresistible. God was not the capricious tyrant in the heavens avowed by Bible-thumpers, but rather a power that resided in the human heart.

“Each soul is potentially divine,” he promised. “The goal is to manifest that divinity within by controlling nature, external and internal.” And to close the deal for the fence-sitters, he punched up Vedanta’s embrace of other faiths and their prophets.

Christ and Buddha were incarnations of the divine, he said, no less than Krishna and his own teacher, Ramakrishna.

Swami Vivekananda was valued for what he represented — Indian thought — and recognized by some of the brightest minds in America. One of them was Nicola Tesla. A few years ago I came across a wonderful documentary on Tesla. (I will dig up the reference later.) There I got to know that Swami Vivekananda and Tesla had met.

[Sahah] Bernhardt, in fact, introduced him to the electromagnetic scientist Nikola Tesla, who was struck by Vivekananda’s knowledge of physics. Both recognized they had been pondering the same thesis on energy—in different languages.

Vivekanand was keenly interested in the science supporting meditation, and Tesla would cite the monk’s contributions in his pioneering research of electricity. “Mr. Tesla was charmed to hear about the Vedantic prana and akasha and the kalpas [time],”

Vivekananda wrote to a friend. “He thinks he can demonstrate mathematically that force and matter are reducible to potential energy. I am to go to see him next week to get this mathematical demonstration. In that case Vedantic cosmology will be placed on the surest of foundations.” For the monk from Calcutta, there were no inconsistencies between science, evolution and religious belief.

Faith, he wrote, must be based upon direct experience, not religious platitudes.

As I said before, the WSJ piece is quite delightful. But I have one tiny disagreement. It is this:

Vivekananda’s influence bloomed well into the mid-20th century, infusing the work of Mahatma Gandhi, Carl Jung, George Santayana, Jane Addams, Joseph Campbell and Henry Miller, among assorted luminaries.

And then he seemed to go into eclipse in the West. American baby boomers—more disposed to “doing” than “being”—have opted for “hot yoga” classes over meditation.

At some point, perhaps in the 1980s, an ancient, profoundly antimaterialist teaching had morphed into a fitness cult with expensive accessories.

The claim that Vivekananda “infusing the work of Mahatma Gandhi” is untenable. Swami Vivekananda exhorted people to be strong, while Gandhi’s call to Indians (and anyone else who would care to listen) was passivity and resignation. Gandhi told people to surrender passively in the face of evil. India has indeed followed Gandhi’s path and rejected Swamiji’s. Examples of that would fill volumes but let me just point out one simple instance.

Auranzeb was one of the many tyrannical rulers of India who slaughtered Indians wholesale. One of the major thoroughfares of the capital of India prominently bears his name.

One can understand that Pakistan celebrates those who invaded and subjugated India but it is absolutely puzzling to see India do so. Why?

The answer must be because Indians are weak. I believe that the day that Indians throw off the yoke of subjugation will be the day that India embarks on the path to emancipation and freedom.

Weak people don’t have the freedom to take what is best and what is good for them. Instead they are forced to take whatever is least threatening to their overlords.

The English language main stream media of India is what it is because it is filled with weak people doing what they are allowed to do by the neo-colonial rulers of India. An article praising Swami Vivekananda would be unthinkable in the Indian MSM.

Imagine if Vedanta and yoga were to be introduced as part of the curriculum in Indian schools. You bet there would be howls of protests from all corners of India.

Vedanta and yoga — what Swamiji meant by the word “religion” — are not for the weak. The intellectuals and seekers of the West who came in contact with Vivekananda and the message he embodied were strong. They freely drank deep from the well of Indian wisdom.

. . . Christopher Isherwood and his friend Aldous Huxley, who wrote the introduction to the 1942 English-language edition of “The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,” a firsthand account (originally published in India in 1898) described by Huxley as “the most profound and subtle utterances about the nature of Ultimate Reality.” Nikhilananda, Salinger’s guru, did the translation, with assistance from Huxley, Joseph Campbell and Margaret Wilson, the daughter of the late president.

Huxley and Isherwood were introduced to Vedanta in the Hollywood Hills in the late 1930s by their countryman, the writer Gerald Heard. In a fitting counterpart to the New York Center, the Hollywood Vedanta society was likewise run by a scholarly and charismatic monk, Prabhavananda, who initiated the English trio of writers.

Like Nikhilananda, Prabhavananda was a magnet for the intelligentsia, and his lectures often attracted the likes of Igor Stravinsky, Laurence Olivier, Vivien Leigh and W. Somerset Maugham (and led to his writing “The Razor’s Edge”). Inspired by Isherwood—who briefly lived at the center as a monk—Greta Garbo asked if she too might move in. Told that a monastery accepts only men, Garbo became testy. “That doesn’t matter!” she thumped. “I’ll put on trousers.”

Henry Miller, who made headlines with his torrid and banned “Tropic of Cancer,” visited with Prabhavananda at the Hollywood center, devoured a small library of Vedanta books and settled down in Big Sur in 1944. Throughout his memoir, “The Air Conditioned Nightmare,” Miller invokes Vivekananda as the great sage of the modern age and the consummate messenger to rescue the West from spiritual bankruptcy.

The supreme irony is that India itself needs rescuing from spiritual bankruptcy — all the while when India itself has the world’s largest stock of spiritual capital safely locked away. As they say in Hindi, दिये के नीचे अँधेरा (“it’s dark right under the lamp”.) Perhaps centuries of slavery has robbed Indians of the discriminating faculty and the intelligence to recognize true wealth and wisdom.

Isherwood’s commitment to Vedanta, like Salinger’s, was unswerving and lifelong. Over the next 20 years, he co-translated with Prabhavananda the Bhagavad Gita, Patanjali’s “Yoga Aphorisms” and Shankara’s “Crest Jewel of Discrimination,” and was the author of several books and tracts on Vivekananda and Ramakrishna.

Alright, I have quoted enough from the WSJ piece. It’s a fairly long piece and I recommend it in its entirety. Here’s one last bit from it.

India has scheduled a yearlong party to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Vivekananda’s birth, beginning on January 12, 2013. There will be plenty of readings of his four texts on yoga as a spiritual discipline. Nine volumes chronicle his talks, writings and ruminations, from screeds against child marriage to Milton’s “Paradise Lost” to his pet goats and ducks. But if there were a single takeaway line that boils down his teachings to one spiritual bullet point, it would be “You are not your body.” This might be bad news for the yoga-mat crowd. The good news for beleaguered souls like Salinger was Vivekananda’s corollary: “You are not your mind.”

[Read more on Swami Vivekananda in this blog.]

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Agenda to kill Ancient Hindu Ayurveda.


This just came across my desk and I agree with content and message and behind the ugly face truth of Sonia Gandhi and her foreign hidden agenda to kill ancient Hindu knowledge of Aayurveda and Medicine.

Narendra modI can send Man Mohan Singh and his cabinet to jail at any time

અપ્રમાણિત દવાઓની આયાતદ્વારા આચરવામાં આવતા બેસુમાર નકલી એનકાઉન્ટરઃ
આરોપી: મનમોહન સિંહની કેબીનેટ

નરેન્દ્ર મોદી ચાહે તો કોઈ પણ ઘડીએ મનમોહન ની પૂરી કેબીનેટને જેલભેગી કરી શકે છે.

વિષયઃ
અસંદિગ્ધરીતે સંદિગ્ધ, અસરહીન અને અપ્રમાણિત એવી “ARV એન્ટી-રિટ્રો-વાઈરલ” નામની એક વિદેશી દવાને અબજો રુપીયાના ખર્ચે આયાત કરવાનું અને તેને ફરજીયાત રીતે ઉપયોગ કરાવવાનું કેન્દ્રીય સરકારનું કાવતરું. જો આ કાવતરામાં સામેલ ન થાઓ તો દંડિત કરવાનું કાવતરું.

મનમોહન અને તેની કેબીનેટ કહે છે “એચ. આઈ. વી. પોઝીટીવ”ને એઈડ ગણો અને બીજી માન્ય ચિકીત્સા પદ્ધતિને અવગણી અમારી વિશ્વ સ્તરે અમાન્ય થયેલી દવાનો ફરજીયાત તમારા દર્દી ઉપર ઉપયોગ કરો અને તેને મારો. જો તેમ ન કરવું હોય તો તો જેલમાં જાઓ. કારણ કે અમારે બીન જરુરી દવા આયાત કરી અમારા ગજવા ભરવા છે અને જે અમને સાથ ન આપે તેમને દંડવા છે.

કેસ સંદર્ભઃ As Central Government is killing this innocent Indian
people in this fake HIV AIDS encountering: Mrs. Jakia Nasim
 SLP 1088/2008 should be discharged as per Law of Natural
Justice.

“એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ એ એઇડ નથી. એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ એ એઈડ થવાની શક્યતા બતાવે છે. “એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ”નો ઉપચાર કરવાથી તે મટી શકે છે. અને તેથી એઈડ થી બચી શકાય છે.

નેચરોપથી એ ગાંધીજી દ્વારા વિશ્વસ્ત અને સરકાર માન્ય ઉપચાર પ્રણાલી છે. અને નેચરોપથી દ્વારા થતા ઉપચારો વડે એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ નો પણ ઉપચાર કરી શકાય છે. આ વાત સરાકારી દસ્તાવેજોમાં ઉપલબ્ધ છે.

પણ કેન્દ્ર સરકાર કે જેણે નેચરોપથીને માન્યતા આપી છે તે છતાં પણ એચ આઈ વી પોઝિટીવને એઈડ ગણે છે.

જે કોઇ બાળક એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ સાથે જન્મે તેને માટે જરુરી નથી કે તેને એઈડ થશે. સામાન્યરીતે જે બાળક એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ સાથે જન્મ્યું હોય તે અઢાર માસમાં એચ આઈ વી નેગેટીવ થઈ જાય છે. છતાં પણ તેને એઈડની સારવાર ચાલુ કરી દેવાય છે.

ARV એન્ટી-રિટ્રો-વાઈરલ નામની દવા બધા જ એચ આઈ વી પોઝીટીવ દર્દીઓને અપાય છે. અને સરકારના નેશનલ એઈડ કન્ટ્રોલ ઓર્ગેનાઈઝેશન દ્વારા આ ARV અપાય છે.
હવે આ ARV એ કોઈ અધિકૃત દવા છે જ નહીં. અને તેનાથી દર્દીઓ બચે છે તે પણ સાબિત થયું નથી તો પણ સરકાર કે જેણે નેચરોપથીની સારવારને માન્યતા આપી છે તો પણ તેને અવગણીને જે દવાને (ARV) ને વિશ્વમાં ક્યાંય પણ માન્યતા મળી નથી તેમજ વિશ્વ આરોગ્ય સંસ્થા એ જે દવાને નકારી છે તે દવાનો કેન્દ્ર સરકાર અને નેશનલ એઈડ કન્ટ્રોલ ઓર્ગેનીઝેશન ARV બનાવતી કંપનીની મીલીભગત થી ARVનો ઉપચારમાં વપરાશ કરી મોટું સડયંત્ર ચલાવી રહી છે. ARV દવા સપ્લાય કરતી કંપનીનું ત્રણ થી પાંચ અબજ રુપીયા વડે ગજવું ભરાય છે અને લગભગ ૨૦૦૦ વયસ્ક લોકો અને ૨૦૦ જેટલા બાળકો રોજ મરે છે. એટલે આ કામ તો કાયદાની દૃષ્ટિએ ગુનાઈત જ થયું કહેવાય.

વળી આ અધુરું હોય તેમ જે ચિકિત્સકો યોગ જેવી નેચરોપથીની ચિકિત્સા દ્વાર ઉપચાર કરે છે તેમને આ કેન્દ્ર સરકાર કોર્ટ કચેરીમાં ખડા કરે છે અને સજા કરી દંડાવે છે.”

પબ્લીક ઈન્ટરેસ્ટ લીટીગેશન ના સંદર્ભમાં આ સાથે પેપર બીડ્યા છે. તેમાં સરકારી સર્ક્યુલર ના સંદર્ભ પણ સામેલ છે.

શિરીષ મોહનલાલ દવે
———————–

શ્રી બાબુભાઇ ઠક્કર શું કહે છે?
Read attachment

SURPRISINGLY, A FOREIGNER OPENS OUR EYES!!!


Very interesting!!

IF THIS IS TRUE, NOW YOU KNOW WHAT HAPPENS TO ALL THE MONEY COLLECTED BY TEMPLES IN INDIA.
SURPRISINGLY, A FOREIGNER OPENS OUR EYES!!!
Believe or not, a Foreign writer opens our eyes… The Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowment Act of 1951 allows State Governments and politicians to take over thousands of Hindu Temples and maintain complete control of the money in any way they choose.

A charge has been made not by any Temple authority, but by a foreign writer, Stephen Knapp, in a book Crimes Against India and the Need to Protect Ancient Vedic Tradition, published in the United States that makes shocking reading.
 Hundreds of temples in centuries past have been built in India by devout rulers and the donations given to them by devotees have been used for the benefit of the (other) people. If, presently, money collected has ever been misused (and that word needs to be defined), it is for the devotees to protest and not for any government to interfere.

This letter is what has been happening currently under an intrusive law. It would seem, for instance, that under a Temple Empowerment Act, about 43,000 temples in Andhra Pradesh have come under government control and only 18 per cent of the revenues of these temples have been returned for temple purposes, the remaining 82 per cent being used for purposes unstated. Apparently even the world famous Tirumala Tirupati Temple has not been spared.

According to Knapp, the temple collects over Rs 3,100 crores every year and the State Government has not denied the charge that as much as 85 per cent of this is transferred to the State Exchequer, much of which goes to causes that are not connected with the Hindu community. Was it for that reason that devotees make their offering to the temples?

Another charge that has been made is that the Andhra Government has also allowed the demolition of at least ten temples for the construction of golf courses. Imagine the outcry, writes Knapp, if ten mosques had been demolished. It would seem that in Karanataka, Rs. 79 crores were collected from about two lakh temples and from that, temples received Rs seven crores for their maintenance, Muslim madrassahs and Haj subsidy were given Rs 59 crore and churches about Rs 13 crore.

Very generous of the government! Because of this, Knapp writes, 25 per cent of the two lakh temples or about 50,000 temples in Karnataka will be closed down for lack of resources, and he adds: The only way the government can continue to do this is because people have not stood up enough to stop it. Knapp then refers to Kerala where, he says, funds from the Guruvayur Temple are diverted to other government projects denying improvement to 45 Hindu temples. Land belonging to the Ayyappa Temple, apparently has been grabbed and Church encroaches are occupying huge areas of forest land, running into thousands of acres, near Sabarimala.

 A charge is made that the Communist state government of Kerala wants to pass an Ordinance to disband the Travancore & Cochin Autonomous Devaswom Boards (TCDBs) and take over their limited independent authority of 1,800 Hindu temples. If what the author says is true, even the Maharashtra Government wants to take over some 450,000 temples in the state which would supply a huge amount of revenue to correct the states bankrupt conditions.

And, to top it all, Knapp says that in Orissa, the state government intends to sell over 70,000 acres of endowment lands from the Jagannath Temple, the proceeds of which would solve a huge financial crunch brought about by its own mismanagement of temple assets. Says Knapp:
Why such occurrences are so often not known is that the Indian media, especially the English television and press, are often anti-Hindu in their approach, and, thus, not inclined to give much coverage, and certainly no sympathy, for anything that may affect the Hindu community. Therefore, such government actions that play against the Hindu community go on without much or any attention attracted to them. Knapp obviously is on record.

If the facts produced by him are incorrect, it is up to the government to say so. It is quite possible that some individuals might have set up temples to deal with lucrative earnings. But, that, surely, is none of the governments’ business? Instead of taking over all earnings, the government surely can appoint local committees to look into temple affairs so that the amount discovered is fairly used for the public good? Says Knapp: Nowhere in the free, democratic world are the religious institutions managed, maligned and controlled by the government, thus denying the religious freedom of the people of the country. But it is happening in India.

Government officials have taken control of Hindu temples because they smell money in them, they recognise the indifference of Hindus, they are aware of the unlimited patience and tolerance of Hindus, they also know that it is not in the blood of Hindus to go to the streets to demonstrate, destroy property, threaten, loot, harm and/or kill. Many Hindus are sitting and watching the demise of their culture.

They need to express their views loud and clear. Knapp obviously does not know that should they do so, they would be damned as communalists. But, it is time someone asked the Government to lay down all the facts on the table so that the public would know what is happening behind its back.
 Robbing Peter to pay Paul is not secularism. And temples are not for looting, under any name. One thought ….. that Mohammad of Ghazni has long been dead?????

Sri Padmanabha Swami Hindu Temple


Padmanabhaswamy Temple I

Image by jynxzero via Flickr

SOME TIMES BY : SANTOSH BHATT

Times of india wants all the wealth found to be distributed amongst poor. What a pathetic idea this dumb editor comes up.

Times Of India, Yellow Journalism..

” Unlike, say, Switzerland, India isn’t rolling in wealth. Even as we trip GDP figures off our tongue, a country is deemed wealthy not when it has plenty of rich people but when it has no one mired in poverty. Tough scenario for a country for a billion-plus people but with India home to enough

folks not getting a square meal a day, there is something awry about a temple in Kerala sitting on a treasure trove supposedly worth ‘Rs 1 lakh crore’ — that is Rs 1,000,000,000,000.
Oh, we know the sanctity of the right to own your wealth and spend it (or not) in whatever manner you choose.

But the Sri Padmanabha Swami temple in Kerala, now unofficially considered the richest temple in the country, isn’t exactly just a fixed deposit that will take care of a family’s Bugatti bills, or even the local mandir or gurdwara providing succour to souls with a cash flow on the side.

In fact, such temples are gargantuan vaults of tax-free wealth. So how about dismantling what are essentially parallel economies by opening these vaults up and use the money to set up private schemes that can bring material comforts to the poor?

Sure, many of these religious institutions have social sch-emes already running. But clearly, much more needs to be done.

If the incentive for such a move is lacking from the trusts of these temples or mosques, why not consider taxing these institutions?

The purpose of taxing people much less wealthy than those who own the wealth of the Padmanabha Swami temple is to bring about some amount of redistribution of wealth through building public facilities such as roads and power stations.

With the temples having enough money to spare, surely being a charitable body won’t make them stingy about spreading the cash for public good?

Especially, since they should be happy to share their wealth in good faith for the purpose of making India a truly rich country.”

With views like these, there is no need of ghoris and Gaznis to break temples and loot when such people with such anti Hindu views are present in Hindusthan

Go after Muslim and Christian first who stole all the land and wealth from native Hindu and then talk about sharing Hindu wealth. Period no if no but and nothing less.

Why are people always after the temples and not after anyother worship places? you are speaking of taking the money from the temple and using it for public good……one fact that you have forgotten my friend is that the so called politicians of this country has more wealth than the worship places,.

The money that people paid as tax for the betterment of the country,was robbed by them and kept in forgein banks,don’t you have the guts to ask them to give it back.

They enter politics as just an average citizen,they go to their graveyard as millioners,leaving back millions for their decendents to live in lavishness………This money belongs to the God……it was donated by humble beleivers,

As a note of thanks giving…….it should stay in the temple,as temple property.

One thing forgotten,its not containers of hard currency which is found,its valuables worth crores,how are you going to use it?

Pave the roads with gold and diamonds?give one diamond to each person?one coin to each person?Sell the valuables?????????

It should be protected,try to generate a revenue from it,by building a museum inside the temple premises for the public to see the heritage,the forgotten era, and a minimal charge taken from them,the revenue of the temple is to increase now as devotees would be flowing in….and that money can be used in public interest.If we oblige to give away the treasure to the benefit of the country,

you would say the Idol is worth crores of rupees,lets sell it for the country……wont you?????

The MAHARAJA who saved this treasure from british rulers should be awarded by the best award(which is given after death) of our country. he was a REAL KING AND REAL DESHBHAKTA.

What is Yantra (यन्त्र) ? The Sanskrit Word


What is Yantra (यन्त्र)  ? The Sanskrit Word
  • Yantra (यन्त्र) is the Sanskrit word for “instrument” or “machine”. Much like the word “instrument” itself, it can stand for symbols.Yantra function as revelatory conduits of cosmic truths. Yantra, as instrument and spiritual technology,it is prototypical and esoteric concept mapping machines or conceptual looms. Certain yantra are he……ld to embody the energetic signatures of, for example, the Universe, consciousness, ishta-devata. Mantras, the Sanskrit syllables inscribed on yantras, are essentially “thought forms” representing divinities or cosmic powers, which exert their influence by means of sound-vibrations.

    Symbols employed in yantrasShapes and patterns commonly employed in yantra include squares, triangles, circles and floral patterns but may also include more complex and detailed symbols, for instance:

    The lotus flower typically represent chakras, with each petal representing a psychic propensity (or vritti) associated with that chakra
    A dot, or bindu, represents the starting point of creation or the infinite, unexpressed cosmos
    The şaţkoņa (Sanskrit name for a symbol identical to the star of David) composed of a balance between:
    An upwards triangle denoting action (or service), extroversion, masculinity or Shiva
    A downwards triangle denoting introversion, meditativeness, goddess energy or Shakti

    Geometric element meanings:

    Circle = Energy of the element water
    Square = Energy of the element earth
    Triangle = Energy of the element fire
    Diagonal lines = Energy of the element air
    Horizontal line = Energy of the element water
    Vertical line = Energy of the element fire
    Point = Energy of the element ether

    As an astrological deviceYantra may be used to represent the astronomical position of the planets over a given date and time. It is considered auspicious in Hindu{Sanatan Dharm} mythology. These yantras are made up on various objects i.e. Paper, Precious stones, Metal Plates and alloys. It is believed that constantly concentrating on the representation helps to build fortunes, as planets have their peculiar gravity which governs basic emotions and karma. These yantras are often made on a particular date and time according to procedures defined in the vedas.

    This one above is Shri Yantra

     

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