Heart Attack and Water –


Hope this helps because I care!

Heart Attack and Water –

I never knew this ! Interesting…….

Heart Attack & Water

Something I didn’t know either! I asked my Doctor why do I and other people urinate so much at night time.

Answer from my Cardiac Doctor = Gravity holds water in the lower part of your body when you are upright (legs swell). When you lie down and the lower body (legs and etc) seeks level with the kidneys it is then that the kidneys remove the water because it is easier.

This then ties in with the last statement!

I knew you need your minimum water to help flush the toxins out of your body, but this was news to me.

Correct time to drink water… Very Important. From A Cardiac Specialist! Drinking water at a certain time maximizes its effectiveness on the body:

2 glasses of water after waking up – helps activate internal organs

1 glass of water 30 minutes before a meal – helps digestion

1 glass of water before taking a bath – helps lower blood pressure

1 glass of water before going to bed – avoids stroke or heart attack .

Please pass this to the people you care about……

I can also add to this… My Physician told me that water at bed time will also help prevent night time leg cramps.

Your leg muscles are seeking hydration when they cramp and wake you up with a Charlie Horse.

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Religion is not for the weak” – Swami Vivekananda


Swami Vivekananda

Swami Vivekananda (Photo credit: On Being)

“Religion is not for the weak” – Swami Vivekananda

via Atanu Dey on India‘s Development

An article on Swami Vivekananda in the Wall Street Journal of 30th March titled, “What Did J.D. Salinger, Leo Tolstoy, and Sarah Bernhardt Have in Common?”

makes for delightful reading. What they had in common was their devotion to Swami Vivekananda, the man who introduced Vedanta and yoga to America.

I did not know that. But anyway, it’s the sort of positive article about a Hindu monk that would give conniptions to the leftist “secular intellectuals” in India.

But the Wall Street Journal does not suffer from the knee-jerk negative reflex of the main stream English language media in India;

the latter would recoil with horror at the mere thought of publishing a laudatory piece about a proud Hindu. Wouldn’t that be tantamount to endorsing — horror of horrors — Hindutva?

Yoga is popular in the US and in many non-Muslim parts of the world. Why it is not popular in the Islamic world is interesting (and more about that later.) An excerpt from the WSJ article:

Although all but forgotten by America’s 20 million would-be yoginis, clad in their finest Lululemon, Vivekananda was the Bengali monk who introduced the word “yoga” into the national conversation.

In 1893, outfitted in a red, flowing turban and yellow robes belted by a scarlet sash, he had delivered a show-stopping speech in Chicago.

The event was the tony Parliament of Religions, which had been convened as a spiritual complement to the World’s Fair, showcasing the industrial and technological achievements of the age.

On its opening day, September 11, Vivekananda, who appeared to be meditating onstage, was summoned to speak and did so without notes.

“Sisters and Brothers of America,” he began, in a sonorous voice tinged with “a delightful slight Irish brogue,” according to one listener, attributable to his Trinity College–educated professor in India. “It fills my heart with joy unspeakable…”

Then something unprecedented happened, presaging the phenomenon decades later that greeted the Beatles (one of whom, George Harrison, would become a lifelong Vivekananda devotee).

The previously sedate crowd of 4,000-plus attendees rose to their feet and wildly cheered the visiting monk, who, having never before addressed a large gathering, was as shocked as his audience. “I thank you in the name of the most ancient order of monks in the world,” he responded, flushed with emotion.

“I thank you in the name of the mother of religions, and I thank you in the name of millions and millions of Hindu people of all classes and sects.”

I feel a kinship to Swami Vivekananda–which arises not merely from my being a Bengali and a Hindu like he was. It’s more of an intellectual kinship that transcends space and time.

Swami ji had the power to move people spiritually and emotionally. I knew that George Harrison was influenced by Indian thought but I did not know that the path lay through Vivekananda:

“No doubt the vast majority of those present hardly knew why they had been so powerfully moved,” Christopher Isherwood wrote a half century later, surmising that a “strange kind of subconscious telepathy” had infected the hall, beginning with Vivekananda’s first words, which have resonated, for some, long after.

Asked about the origins of “My Sweet Lord,” George Harrison replied that “the song really came from Swami Vivekananda, who said, ‘If there is a God, we must see him. And if there is a soul, we must perceive it.’ ”

The teachings of Vedanta are rooted in the Vedas, ancient scriptures going back several thousand years that also inform Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism.

The Vedic texts of the Upanishads enshrine a core belief that God is within and without—that the divine is everywhere.

The Bhagavad Gita (Song of God) is another sacred text or gospel, whereas Hinduism is actually a coinage popularized by Vivekananda to describe a faith of diverse and myriad beliefs.

Vivekananda’s genius was to simplify Vedantic thought to a few accessible teachings that Westerners found irresistible. God was not the capricious tyrant in the heavens avowed by Bible-thumpers, but rather a power that resided in the human heart.

“Each soul is potentially divine,” he promised. “The goal is to manifest that divinity within by controlling nature, external and internal.” And to close the deal for the fence-sitters, he punched up Vedanta’s embrace of other faiths and their prophets.

Christ and Buddha were incarnations of the divine, he said, no less than Krishna and his own teacher, Ramakrishna.

Swami Vivekananda was valued for what he represented — Indian thought — and recognized by some of the brightest minds in America. One of them was Nicola Tesla. A few years ago I came across a wonderful documentary on Tesla. (I will dig up the reference later.) There I got to know that Swami Vivekananda and Tesla had met.

[Sahah] Bernhardt, in fact, introduced him to the electromagnetic scientist Nikola Tesla, who was struck by Vivekananda’s knowledge of physics. Both recognized they had been pondering the same thesis on energy—in different languages.

Vivekanand was keenly interested in the science supporting meditation, and Tesla would cite the monk’s contributions in his pioneering research of electricity. “Mr. Tesla was charmed to hear about the Vedantic prana and akasha and the kalpas [time],”

Vivekananda wrote to a friend. “He thinks he can demonstrate mathematically that force and matter are reducible to potential energy. I am to go to see him next week to get this mathematical demonstration. In that case Vedantic cosmology will be placed on the surest of foundations.” For the monk from Calcutta, there were no inconsistencies between science, evolution and religious belief.

Faith, he wrote, must be based upon direct experience, not religious platitudes.

As I said before, the WSJ piece is quite delightful. But I have one tiny disagreement. It is this:

Vivekananda’s influence bloomed well into the mid-20th century, infusing the work of Mahatma Gandhi, Carl Jung, George Santayana, Jane Addams, Joseph Campbell and Henry Miller, among assorted luminaries.

And then he seemed to go into eclipse in the West. American baby boomers—more disposed to “doing” than “being”—have opted for “hot yoga” classes over meditation.

At some point, perhaps in the 1980s, an ancient, profoundly antimaterialist teaching had morphed into a fitness cult with expensive accessories.

The claim that Vivekananda “infusing the work of Mahatma Gandhi” is untenable. Swami Vivekananda exhorted people to be strong, while Gandhi’s call to Indians (and anyone else who would care to listen) was passivity and resignation. Gandhi told people to surrender passively in the face of evil. India has indeed followed Gandhi’s path and rejected Swamiji’s. Examples of that would fill volumes but let me just point out one simple instance.

Auranzeb was one of the many tyrannical rulers of India who slaughtered Indians wholesale. One of the major thoroughfares of the capital of India prominently bears his name.

One can understand that Pakistan celebrates those who invaded and subjugated India but it is absolutely puzzling to see India do so. Why?

The answer must be because Indians are weak. I believe that the day that Indians throw off the yoke of subjugation will be the day that India embarks on the path to emancipation and freedom.

Weak people don’t have the freedom to take what is best and what is good for them. Instead they are forced to take whatever is least threatening to their overlords.

The English language main stream media of India is what it is because it is filled with weak people doing what they are allowed to do by the neo-colonial rulers of India. An article praising Swami Vivekananda would be unthinkable in the Indian MSM.

Imagine if Vedanta and yoga were to be introduced as part of the curriculum in Indian schools. You bet there would be howls of protests from all corners of India.

Vedanta and yoga — what Swamiji meant by the word “religion” — are not for the weak. The intellectuals and seekers of the West who came in contact with Vivekananda and the message he embodied were strong. They freely drank deep from the well of Indian wisdom.

. . . Christopher Isherwood and his friend Aldous Huxley, who wrote the introduction to the 1942 English-language edition of “The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,” a firsthand account (originally published in India in 1898) described by Huxley as “the most profound and subtle utterances about the nature of Ultimate Reality.” Nikhilananda, Salinger’s guru, did the translation, with assistance from Huxley, Joseph Campbell and Margaret Wilson, the daughter of the late president.

Huxley and Isherwood were introduced to Vedanta in the Hollywood Hills in the late 1930s by their countryman, the writer Gerald Heard. In a fitting counterpart to the New York Center, the Hollywood Vedanta society was likewise run by a scholarly and charismatic monk, Prabhavananda, who initiated the English trio of writers.

Like Nikhilananda, Prabhavananda was a magnet for the intelligentsia, and his lectures often attracted the likes of Igor Stravinsky, Laurence Olivier, Vivien Leigh and W. Somerset Maugham (and led to his writing “The Razor’s Edge”). Inspired by Isherwood—who briefly lived at the center as a monk—Greta Garbo asked if she too might move in. Told that a monastery accepts only men, Garbo became testy. “That doesn’t matter!” she thumped. “I’ll put on trousers.”

Henry Miller, who made headlines with his torrid and banned “Tropic of Cancer,” visited with Prabhavananda at the Hollywood center, devoured a small library of Vedanta books and settled down in Big Sur in 1944. Throughout his memoir, “The Air Conditioned Nightmare,” Miller invokes Vivekananda as the great sage of the modern age and the consummate messenger to rescue the West from spiritual bankruptcy.

The supreme irony is that India itself needs rescuing from spiritual bankruptcy — all the while when India itself has the world’s largest stock of spiritual capital safely locked away. As they say in Hindi, दिये के नीचे अँधेरा (“it’s dark right under the lamp”.) Perhaps centuries of slavery has robbed Indians of the discriminating faculty and the intelligence to recognize true wealth and wisdom.

Isherwood’s commitment to Vedanta, like Salinger’s, was unswerving and lifelong. Over the next 20 years, he co-translated with Prabhavananda the Bhagavad Gita, Patanjali’s “Yoga Aphorisms” and Shankara’s “Crest Jewel of Discrimination,” and was the author of several books and tracts on Vivekananda and Ramakrishna.

Alright, I have quoted enough from the WSJ piece. It’s a fairly long piece and I recommend it in its entirety. Here’s one last bit from it.

India has scheduled a yearlong party to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Vivekananda’s birth, beginning on January 12, 2013. There will be plenty of readings of his four texts on yoga as a spiritual discipline. Nine volumes chronicle his talks, writings and ruminations, from screeds against child marriage to Milton’s “Paradise Lost” to his pet goats and ducks. But if there were a single takeaway line that boils down his teachings to one spiritual bullet point, it would be “You are not your body.” This might be bad news for the yoga-mat crowd. The good news for beleaguered souls like Salinger was Vivekananda’s corollary: “You are not your mind.”

[Read more on Swami Vivekananda in this blog.]

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Lessons from the ghost, A Hindu Wisdom


A picture of Vetal hanging by a tree and Vikra...

Image via Wikipedia

Lessons from the ghost

via Devdutt by Devdutt on 1/30/12

Published in First City,  January 2012  

A sorcerer once requested the legendary King Vikramaditya of Ujjain to fetch him a Vetal or ghost that hung upside down, like a bat, from the branches of a tree that stood in the middle of a crematorium

Not wanting to disappoint anyone who approached him, Vikramaditya immediately set out for the crematorium determined to fetch the Vetal.

“Make sure you do not talk to him. If you speak, he will slip away from your grasp,” warned the sorcerer.

Vikramaditya entered the crematorium, found the tree, and the Vetal hanging upside down from its branches. He caught the ghost, pulled it down and made his way back to the city when the ghost started chatting with him, telling him all kinds of things, annoying him, yelling into his ears, cursing him, praising him, anything to make him talk but Vikramaditya refused to succumb to these tricks.

Finally, the Vetal told Vikramaditya a story, a case study one might say, and at the end of it asked the king a question. “If you are indeed the wise Vikramaditya, as you claim to be, you should know the answer to the riddle. But how will I know if you are truly he, unless you speak? And if you choose to stay silent, I am free to assume I have been caught by a commoner, a pretender, a mimic!”

Too arrogant to be called a commoner, the king gave the answer. And it was a brilliant answer, one that made the Vetal gasp in admiration.

And then, he slipped away and went back to hang upside down from the branches of the tree in the middle of the crematorium.

So Vikramaditya had to walk back to the tree once again and pull the Vetal down once again.

Once again, the Vetal told him a story with a question at the end. Once again the Vetal told the king, “If you are indeed the wise Vikramaditya, as you claim to be, you should know the answer to the riddle. But how will I know if you are truly he, unless you speak? And if you choose to stay silent, I am free to assume I have been caught by a commoner, a pretender, a mimic!”

Once again, the arrogant king gave the answer. Once again the Vetal gasped in admiration.

And once again he slipped away.

This happened twenty-four times. The twenty-fifth time, a tired and exasperated Vikramaditya, sighed in relief.

He had succeeded.

“Have you really?” asked the Vetal, “How do you know the answers you gave the previous times were right? Each decision was subjective, not objective. You thought you were right, and so you spoke. Now you are not sure of the answer, and so remain silent. This silence will cost you dear. You will succeed in taking me to the sorcerer who will use his magic to make me his genie and do his bidding. His first order for me will be to kill you.

So you see, Vikramaditya, as long as you kept answering my questions, rightly or wrongly, you were doing yourself a favor. You had to keep chasing me, but you stayed king. Now that you doubt yourself, and stay silent, you are sure to end up dead.”

At the moment of decision-making, decisions are not right or wrong. They are right or wrong only in hindsight.

He who takes decisions proactively, he who is not afraid to let the Vetal slip away, he who knows that life is about solving one problem after another, is Vikramaditya.

To improve decision-making, Vikramaditya has to visit the crematorium where the past hangs upside down like ghosts and confront the Vetal.

This is where learning takes place. This is where he hones his skills.

The Vetal is the mentor, the trainer, the coach, the teacher, the guru, who presents the past as case studies and asks questions in the form of riddles and puzzles.

Does the Vetal know the answer?

Maybe yes, maybe no. It does not matter.

What matters is that Vikramaditya answers the questions and solves the problems.

Every answer, every solution, is subjective; only time will reveal if they are right and wrong.

If Vikramaditya refuses to answer, he will end up destroying himself and his kingdom.

A leader matters only as long as he seeks to solve problems.

Vikramaditya must always go to Vetal; the Vetal must never go to Vikramaditya.

Vetal is Saraswati. Unlike Lakshmi and Durga which can be given, Saraswati cannot be given. She has to be taken.

The crematorium is not a place where business happens, but it is here that the mind is expanded and beliefs are clarified.

It is a place of new ideas, new thoughts, new frameworks, that facilitate decision-making.

The more Vikramaditya visits the crematorium, the more he expands his mind, the more he gains Saraswati and the more attractive he becomes to power and prosperity, Durga and Lakshmi.

The process of gaining Saraswati is two fold.

There is the outer voice called Smriti and the inner voice called Shruti.

Smriti means that which can be remembered hence transmitted. Shruti means that which can only be heard but cannot be transmitted.

What a teacher teaches a student, what is passed on through texts and puzzles and riddles and questions and case studies, is just Smriti. These can be parroted and passed on. These can be mouthed to impress people.

But real learning happens when the aspirant listens to his own voice, the inner voice of his mind.

This is the only voice we hear. This is Shruti.

Only when Smriti provokes Shruti, do we internalize wisdom.

It becomes part of us. When this happens, we do not have to provide references for our knowledge (“This idea comes from that teacher”). We become the source of the knowledge (“This is my idea”).

Books and lectures are Smriti; they can be remembered and passed on.

The reader or listener can allow it to provoke Shruti.

Only when they listen to their inner voice and truly ‘get it’, will this knowledge of the past transform into timeless wisdom.

The way to this is to introspect on it, personalize it, rather than intellectualize it.

Frameworks appear when we see the mirror and are comfortable with the reflection.

As long as frameworks are meant to change the world, not ourselves, Saraswati will remain Vidya-Lakshmi, skill that grants prosperity, but not peace.

We will stay trapped in Swarga, like Indra, eternally on a shaky throne.

We will never find Vaikuntha, where Lakshmi sits at our feet, and we always enjoy the rhythmic swing of the waves.

Every king whose rule extends up to the horizon, the Chakravarti, is no different from the Kupmanduka, the frog in the well.

The walls of his kingdom define his well. However great the size may be, it is but a drop in the canvas of infinity.

 There is always scope to grow, outgrow the animal within, stop chasing Durga and Lakshmi, and make them chase him instead.

For this he has to cut his head.

Vetal cuts the head. Shruti cuts the head.

Cutting of the head is a metaphor for intellectual as well as emotional growth.

Intellectual growth may make us more skilled and less insecure, but it does not enable us to empathize. T

he point is not to be knowledgeable; the point is to be wise.

And in India, wisdom happens when knowledge combines with empathy, gyan with karuna.

When The Lost Brothers Met – Shuddhi Report from Shahjahanpur


ओ३म् O3 m (Aum), considered by the Arya Samaj ...

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When The Lost Brothers Met – Shuddhi Report from Shahjahanpur

January 21, 2012 By

(WE ARE POSTING THIS EXTREMELY EMOTIONAL ARTICLE AS IT IS. WE RECEIVED IT ON MAIL FROM ONE OF THE PARTICIPANTS OF GRAND SHUDDHI YAJNA)

Shahjahanpur.23 Dec 2011: Morning was approaching. It was an ordinary morning of 23rd of December, 2011. Sun was desperate to grow bright and spread its rays on entire humanity as a part of its daily ritual. It was rising in its forever august manner with a mission to remove the Darkness and fulfill the world with Brightness.

People were gathering around chai-waalas. Women were sweeping the floors. School children were getting ready to go to their schools. Some were going for a walk; some were still lazy in their beds. Shahjahanpur and Life in Shahjahanpur is not different from its other siblings in Uttar Pradesh with the exception that it is the Honored birthplace of a Legendary freedom fighter and martyr Pandit Ramprasad Bismil – true Son of Mother India. Bust of this patriot stood neglected in a small park, encroached by one of our desi chai-waalah.

But was this 23rd of December, 2011 an ordinary day in the history of Shahjahanpur? Or the Divine power had other plans in place for the day to come. Later we would discover through the Locals that on the fateful Morning of 23rd December there was something DIVINE happening in the surroundings of the city.

The air was cold but filled with unknown warmth. The night was dark but waiting for light to enlighten the city. The usual morning chaos were present everywhere but things were surprisingly in order. Sad faces were visible but eyes of those sad faces were gleaming for unknown reason.

Many people [regardless of their faith and way of life] had dreams of the previous night about some angels with white wings circling the city and their houses.

The atmosphere was charged up. The Sun was in hurry to spread its wings to welcome the angels with white wings.

A MIRACLE WAS AWAITING TO HAPPEN.

As it turned out, this 23rd of December, 2011 was destined to witness glad tidings of change. Shahjahanpur had been chosen by the Merciful God to be a blessed city. Messengers of change were sent by HIM and those messengers had entered this blessed city the previous night.

The very first rays of sun with affection kissed the forehead of these messengers of change aka Agniveers as they stood in the Arya Samaj Temple ready to perform the divine task after their meditation. Within a matter of minutes the messengers of change from Agniveer had beautified the Arya Samaj Temple with Agniveer Banner, which read- VISHAL SHUDDHI YAJNA. Morning was cold. Some persons shivered while others dared the cold. Happily daring were more in number. It was a “festival mood” in Shahjahanpur. After a while the messengers from Agniveer could hear the chants of Gayatri Mantra coming from all directions at regular intervals. Soon those voices kept coming near and near. The messengers were pleased to see that these rejoiced voices were of those blessed souls who had come with a soul purpose of leaving the darkness behind and walk towards enlightenment. These blessed souls kept repeating “Tamso Ma Jyotrigamay”.

These blessed people were chosen to be the first among countless souls who would later on embrace Vedic Dharma. Arya Samaj Temple was the place chosen  to perform this VEDIC SHUDDHI YAJNA.  Vehicles filled with people of all ages, Male, Female and children started to arrive. These 250 families had come for ‘SHUDDHI EVENT’ to embrace a life style which would transform their lives forever.  About 1200 persons had come to sow the seed of Humanity, brotherhood and Godly love in their hearts. These blessed souls had come to convey the message of Vedas “Peace Be Upon All and Hate None”.

The VISHAL SHUDDHI YAJNA started with seeking blessings of the God by reciting the most beautiful ‘Gayatri Mantra”. When these people started reciting Gayatri Mantra it could be heard by people in far places in the city.

Recitation of Gayatri Mantra by around 1,300 people had created such a magnetic impact which could be felt for days to come in the Arya Samaj Temple at Shahjehanpur. After then these blessed souls sat around holy fire [AGNI] on the altar and offered their prayers.

Captivating and charming sound of ‘Aum Swaha- Aum Swaha’ filled the atmosphere. These people were away from enlightenment for centuries and they did not know to recite the Vedic Mantra’s but the voice of “Aum Swaha” could be heard from miles away.

The messengers of change aka Agniveers also witnessed one more pleasant scene. These people had taken a vow to recite “Gayatri Mantra” in the morning an evening till they learn do proper “Sandhya” (a powerful meditation method for success).

Participants were so overwhelmed with the entire sequence of events that they formed small groups and started reciting “Gayatri Mantra” to each other so that they can keep this gift of God close to their hearts. It appeared that everything was happening with some kind of Divine Inspiration. We will never be able to forget those moments.

Messenger of change from Agniveer were treated by these participants like angels. Countless people had dreamt of  angels with white wings encircling the city and their houses previous night and the next morning they were meeting the Agniveers in white clothes. This was enough for the people to realize that everything that was happening was a Divine wish.  Whenever these small groups had difficulty is reciting the “Gayatri Mantra” or they had any other doubt they would call Agniveers.

It would be grossly unfair to the emotions of the participants if  this specific incident remained to be mentioned here. Out of 1,200 participants there were around 400-500 of our sisters and mothers.  When our sisters met the Messengers of Change and found that the angels with white wings were none other than Agniveers, the bond was immediately established between souls of brothers and sisters.

A small girl who told her name as Maimuna [ for life now “Manisha”] asked the Agniveers if she could tie Rakhi to Agniveers since she did not have brothers. Agniveers offered their hands but there was no Rakhi to tie. But these minor difficulties could not come in the way of relation of brothers and sisters which was established by God. The sacred thread [JANEU] was treated as Rakhi. All the eyes were wet with tears.

After seeing this some old ladies started to cry with happiness. “Rakshabandhan” was celebrated on 23rd December, 2011 in Shehjehanpur.

Afterwords, Manisha [formerly known as Maimuna] told that her mother had died while giving birth to 6th girl child. When Agniveers met Manisha’s father Shri Narsingh Thakur [formerly known as Noorjahan Teli] he told that his wife Khurshida was not in favor of another child but the local Maulvi had told him that children are gift of Allah and it was obligatory upon every Muslim to produce as many children as they can.  He informed us that Maulvi of his village had told him that Shri Narsingh Thakur will go to heaven since his three children had died while they had not attained puberty.

On being asked “why this Yajna”, another sister Vedika Singh Thakur [Formerly known as Nagma Sheikh] could not contain her emotions and shared her joy and happiness with everyone in these words -“This is not a ritual. This is my freedom from shackles of baseless tradition. In Islam I was always forced to hide myself behind Burqua. I was never considered equal to my male counterparts. Now I am free. I am equal to others. I feel liberated from “dakiyanoosi” thinking of earlier faith.”

Another brother Gyan Swarup Sharma [formerly known as Mohammed Giyasusudin ] expressed his happiness in these words  “we have done away with our ignorance. We want to have true knowledge. Only this Vedic culture makes us rational and reasonable as it has its very foundation on reason. This is the most rational philosophy in the world”. Number of people, number of views but amazingly all were submerged in humanity and love.

People wore sacred threads and took pledge that they would live a pure and noble life with peace and harmony, hate ignorance as a devil and educate their children at any cost. They will worship the True Vedic God, and not so called Gods of Mohammedans/Christians or any other God. They swore to not to tolerate any agent between them & their Almighty father.

All these blessed people promised in front of sacred fire [AGNI] that all those evil shameful practices of insulting woman- best creation of Supreme Lord, which were being observed by them due to their wrong belief, ignorance and social compulsion, i e.  Triple Talaq, Polygamy, Unequal rights of women in marriage, Nikah Halala, be immediately stopped and they will follow the message of Vedic God. They would respect women and won’t treat them as Half-Intelligent.

Another brother Yashpal Chauhan [ formerly known as Mohammed Yusuf khan] a resident of nearby village told the Agniveers that he had never before experienced such bliss in his life. He added “I was wandering in vain. Now I know my destination”.

Another brother Shivam Singh Chaudhary [ formerly knows as Mohammed Sadiq Ali] said “This is the religion of our ancestors who were converted by force. I have left that implied religion where I had no dignity. I am feeling like I have come to my home NOW”.

Another brother Shushil Kumar Dubey [formerly known as Suhail Khan] was too eager to speak to the messengers of change from Agniveer. He said “I have returned to my home. Home coming is always best. It cannot be described in words. At home there is your Mother and your well-wishers. Agniveer is our well-wisher”.

It was clear that people have got a glimpse of ‘light of truth’ now. They were determined to shun darkness and ignorance at any cost. Rays of sun and holy fire [AGNI] had given them much needed inner power and strength. This was because of joy of their heart.

After the SHUDDHI YAJNA these blessed people shared their pains and sufferings with Agniveers. Everyone had few common things to share. Their previous faith had told them that easiest way to go to Jannat / Heaven was to produce more and more children irrespective of the fact that:

a] Females were physically incapable to produce more children,

b] Parents were not able to afford even basic education of the newborn childrens;

c] Family were not financially sound to give decent life to the newborn babies.

Now, since they were out of ignorance they had realized that no one can get Jannat / heaven by producing unlimited children but heaven could be achieved only by rightful actions and noble deeds.

Messengers of Change were moved by their conditions and Agniveers announced academic scholarships and medical aid to all the children in purified families up to senior secondary schooling. Agniveers made these promises inspite of knowing their financial constraints and large expenses required for this project.

But that’s where Agniveers stand apart from the crowd.

Agniveers believe that these people had come to Vedic Dharma by Divine inspiration. Agniveers will find in its mission of selfless service righteous people of Vedic Dharma who will feel the pain of our brothers and sisters in need and open their hearts and houses for these brothers and sisters.

This was a real home coming; Coming back to Vedas, Coming back to our roots. Coming to a place where all are equal in eyes of Almighty without Bias, where everybody strives to be Noble, to enjoy eternal bliss, to attain ‘Moksha’. This home never says “believe blindly” but always stresses on “know first and only then believe”. This was a tight slap on face of dividing Trinity / Oil powers trying to divide Bharat / India in the name of man-made religions and faiths.

It is apparent that Messengers of Change aka Agniveers will do a solid work on this front which is deliberately neglected by our policy makers. When we asked the event coordinator of Agniveers about this event they replied with a smile “This is just a beginning and nothing more than trailer of the movie and tip of the Iceberg. Agniveer team is going to organize 786 such events within a year at various places across Bharat / India. Just wait and watch”.

Yeah, we shall watch and see the charisma of Agniveer. Hope is still breathing. Dream of Bharat is alive.

Vande Mataram. Lets Make the Whole World Noble. God is One.

Vedas became omniform for all periods of time


The Rig Veda is one of the oldest religious te...

Image via Wikipedia

By Prem Sabhlok

Via e-mail

Swami Viveknanda had said that religion is a spiritual science. Many contemporary gurus, swamis, pujaris and priests are not able to explain the concept of spiritual science. But most of them agree that the Vedas are the supreme scriptures of Hindus. The Bhagavad-Gita mentions that study of Vedas is the highest virtue. Adi Granth Sahib says Asankh grantha mukhi Vedpatha. There are innumerable scriptures but Vedic study is the supreme.

Sad-Darshana (six schools of Indian philosophy),  based on Vedic metaphysics and Vedic Ishta theory-paths, aim at welfare of mankind. They have made it amply clear that to know the concept of religion as spiritual science, the study of the Vedas is essential. To avoid spread of pious forgeries in the society, Swami Dayananda had suggested study and propagation of Vedic knowledge for the Aryans (noble people).

After the study of the Vedas through English translation of mantras, riks, hymns and even some verses, it was apparent the religion as spiritual science is dharma and it is an institution of social, moral, ethical and spiritual uplift of mankind. It is based on certain principles of spiritual science relating to Rta (cosmic laws of Nature), ideal mosaic society where people follow four divine professions (chatvar varnas) allotted through the Vedic education system based on merit, ability and aptitude and certainly not by birth.

The concept of guru —  Gu means darkness and Ru means to dispel —  dispeller of inner and outer darkness as a preceptor, the cosmic delusion (maya), the difference between soul, manifested soul, spirit and their respective roles, prakrti (divine Nature), the ineffable and formless Supreme Reality Brahman, the cosmic word “Om” (Shabd Brahma) cause of origin of the universe, physical sciences and scientific temper and many other subjects and concepts have been explained in the context of dharma as spiritual science.

In the social aspect of dharma, the Vedas refer to healthy community life through sabha and vidhta, local self-governance, iddm nan mmam — enlightened liberalism (nothing for self all for society), etc.

With regard to the moral aspect hydra-headed corruption with nine heads and 99 sources of entry in the human body is mentioned and solution thereof to eliminate corruption.

On the ethical aspect of dharma, trivarga (three kinds of value systems are explained) and as regard spiritual side of dharma harmonized divine, spiritual and material knowledge (para jnan) is explained in great details.

After study of the Vedas, I wrote Glimpses of Vedic Metaphysics as a part of Vedic spiritual science. Hence the book is by a commoner for the common human beings and seekers of Vedic knowledge, who may not have time to study over 17,000 mantras/riks in all the four Vedas, but are keen to know what these shrutis contain. The Atharva Veda clearly mentions when soul was provided to the human beings, the Vedas were revealed (hence shrutis).

Thus the Vedas became omniform for all periods of time. The study of the Vedas can save simple, honest and God-loving people from the pious forgeries of “leaders of hope” like miracles, breaking unity into diversity of cults/sects or even declaring Veda mantras have secret divine power.

Instead of publishing the book and commercially pricing it, I opted for putting it on the Internet for online reading and even taking print at no cost. It is available on http://www.sabhlokcity.com/metaphysics. The book can be accessed through google.com, yahoo.com, lulu.com search for the book or just Vedic Metaphysics.

Smile Philosophy


Rules to Live By…..

Some Times : Santosh Bhatt

Smile reveals the world to us. Body and soul crave it. It triggers in our heart the sensations of love. Smiles feed us, supplying the energy for us to grow.

It inspires us with dreams and hopes.

Smiles cast an aura of mystery and beauty in the face of those who smile. Faces lit with smiles enlighten the whole world.

Smile is almost like air. A human would no longer linger over the concept of smile than a fish would ponder over the notion of water.

But people are smiling less and less these days. Why are people smiling less? And what can be done about it?

The answer is that nobody knows. The reason nobody knows is a flipside of the Human behavior – its uncertain nature.

In theory, solving this sort of problem is easy.

Connect to life by doing things you never thought possible. Spend more time with family and friends. Now you can really start living. And ultimately you will smile.

But in reality it is very difficult to smile when you are having multidimensional problems throttling your neck all the time.

Furthermore, not every man or woman who smiles is happy. Nor every man or woman who doesn’t smile is sad.

Such is the mystery of life, my friend.

But remember, sometimes, when we cry, we shed happiness instead of tears, and therein lies the true test of heart and the hearts character.

It’s easy to shed happiness, but it’s tough to gather it thereafter.

Sometimes it takes a moment, an hour, a day or a week but at times, you may not be able to gather them at all after years and years.

Take care of your happiness, no matter how tiny they are – they’re as precious as the dawn.

Isn’t life all about challenges and wouldn’t it be nice to grow old with few more laugh lines?

It’s easy if you know how to make more friends and fewer foes with your humbleness and attitude.

Hence, greet the unhappy face, with a beautiful smile.

Treat the scorched ears, with the jingle of rhapsody. Feed the desiccated heart, with the fountain of love. Extinguish the darkness, with the lamp of perception. Heal the sore of the wounded, with the balm of compassion. Escort the estranged soul, with the cohort of hope.

Solve the violent problem, with a non-violent solution.

Bathe the desert of malice, with the dew of harmony. Chop the branches of woe with the sickle of laughter. Enshroud the smoggy mind, with the luminous rays of humanity. Demolish the mansion of falsehood, with the bull-dozer of truth. Add meaning to your life, by subtracting the egos one by one.

Paint the canvas of your dreams, with the blood of your sweat for you are the Picasso of your own life.

Life, yes, it is not the distance between the cradle and the grave.

It is the borderless edge. You never know how far you will reach or how soon you shall fall in the pit.

So cheer up, smile often and make yourself necessary to yourself and you will never be sad, my friend!

I’ve learned…


TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY

Written by Andy Rooney, a man who has the gift of saying so much with so few words.

is at the feet of an elderly person.

I’ve learned…. That when you’re in love, it shows.

I’ve learned…. That just one person saying to me, ‘You’ve made my day!’ makes my day.

I’ve learned…. That having a child fall asleep in your arms is one of the most peaceful feelings in the world.

I’ve learned…. That being kind is more important than being right.

I’ve learned…. That you should never say no to a gift from a child.

I’ve learned…. That I can always pray for someone when I don’t have the strength to help him in some other way.

I’ve learned…. That no matter how serious your life requires you to be, everyone needs a friend to act goofy with.

I’ve learned…. That sometimes all a person needs is a hand to hold and a heart to understand.

I’ve learned…. That simple walks with my father around the block on summer nights when I was a child did wonders for me as an adult.

I’ve learned…. That life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.

I’ve learned…. That we should be glad God doesn’t give us everything we ask for.

I’ve learned…. That money doesn’t buy class.

I’ve learned…. That it’s those small daily happenings that make life so spectacular.

I’ve learned… That under everyone’s hard shell is someone who wants to be appreciated and loved.

I’ve learned…. That to ignore the facts does not change the facts.

I’ve learned…. That when you plan to get even with someone, you are only letting that person continue to hurt you.

I’ve learned…. That love, not time, heals all wounds.

I’ve learned…. That the easiest way for me to grow as a person is to surround myself with people who are smarter than I am.

I’ve learned…. That everyone you meet deserves to be greeted with a smile.

I’ve learned…. That no one is perfect until you fall in love with them.

I’ve learned…. That life is tough, but I’m tougher.

I’ve learned…. That opportunities are never lost; someone will take the ones you miss.

I’ve learned…. That when you harbor bitterness, happiness will dock elsewhere.

I’ve learned…. That I wish I could have told my Mom that I love her one more time before she passed away.

I’ve learned…. That one should keep his words both soft and tender, because tomorrow he may have to eat them.

I’ve learned…. That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.

I’ve learned…. That when your newly born grandchild holds your little finger in his little fist, that you’re hooked for life.

I’ve learned…. That everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you’re climbing it.

I’ve learned …. That the less time I have to work with, the more things I get done.

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